Top five games that secretly teach life skills for kids (part 1)

Childhood may be a cruelly short period of a person’s life but the clan’s family tree is a big part of what makes things memorable. Playing games with kids is a fantastic opportunity to connect and create sweet moment with them. It is also an essential part of the learning process, teaching kids skills that will help them later in life. Let’s get started with these top six games to discover how they model real-life situations and helps kids learn how to act.

1. Duck, Duck, Goose

Duck, Duck, Goose is one of the most favorite games among kids. It is not only funny but also excellent for teaching kids strategic thinking. Players sit in a circle with one walking around, tapping each head in turn, and saying “duck.” They finally pick one kid to be the “goose” and run around to try to take that kid’s place before the “goose” can catch them. If they reach the end without getting tagged, the “goose” comes back to its own seat and the original player continues running around the circle.

Playing this game makes kids think about how to pick a player to be the “goose” who will help them have a better chance of getting back to their seats without being tagged. Therefore, the game teaches kids to make a plan and know the importance of their decisions.

2. Musical Chairs

Playing Musical Chairs teaches kids to deal with disappointment, resolve arguments peacefully, and practice patience. Place chairs in a circle, one fewer than the number of kids joining the game, and play music while kids walk around the circle. Once the music stops, kids must try to sit on a chair and the kid who don’t get a chair are out. Then remove a chair and start again.

This game teaches children how to deal with the frustration of being out of the game, so practicing patience and waiting graciously. They also learn to use their words to argue about who got the chair first or whose chair is whose. An adult should be there to make sure conflicts are settled peacefully as well as to help kids who have to be out of the game remain cheerful.